Seasonal Changes to Maximise Profits

By | May 8, 2013

With what seemed to be a never-ending winter season, it’s hard to believe that summer is less than 2 months away. As seasons change so do consumer business habits and consequently small businesses need to change to reflect them as well. Seasonal changes are the perfect reason to offer sales and discounts and different times of the year call for different marketing strategies.

Take right now, for example, everyone is tired of being in the house. People want to get out and get some sun, breathe some fresh air, and enjoy the flowers as they start to bloom. Because they’ve been cooped up for so long they’re probably ready to do a little spending, too. As a small business owner you can capitalize on this by enticing customers to stop by your business. Perhaps offering a “spring cleaning sale” discounting particular items could be just what it takes to entice customers to walk into your door.

It doesn’t have to be only sales, though, that drive your seasonal marketing campaigns. As holidays and other annual occasions roll around it’s a great time to have small events at your store that can help bring customers in. Hosting a back-to-school family day in autumn where kids can show up to your store and get a free hand-out of pencils or other school supplies can drive enough customers through the door to put any traditional advertising strategy to shame.

This type of “event” can also be done with your website. An online loan company like wongaforbusiness could offer lower interests rates during the winter season as a Christmas special, for example. In fact the Wonga loan websites routinely update their website’s background art to reflect the seasonal changes. This helps to not only ensure visitors that the website is regularly maintained but it also help to soften the face of what is a austere business model. Fiverr.com, a micro-job site where users sell products or services for $5, recently had a spring celebration where users could find rabbits on the website during Easter; finding one would result in on-site credit good for another purchase. While not everyone got a prize, the hope that they could find a rabbit drove a lot of traffic and kept users visiting more often during the event.

It’s important to remember, though, that you need to plan these types of sales events in advance. Because they are meant to drive a lot more clients through your door, you need to be able to cover the “best case scenario”. If all of your sale items are gone within the first hour, everyone else that shows up will be quiet disappointed and possibly feel a bit scammed.

 

Author: This is a guest post by wongaforbusiness.

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